Scump Voices Frustrations with Call of Duty League Censorship

Scump lashed out at the CDL over fines and censorship in a series of tweets late last night.

Last night, OpTic Chicago’s Seth “Scump” Abner voiced his frustrations with the Call of Duty League’s control over their players, and censorship of their opinions. Scump tweeted his frustrations with Black Ops Cold War’s lack of a League Play feature. He stated that “it should be a staple, but it gets ignored.”

This prompted a response from Treyarch’s Lead designer David Vionderhaar, saying how his team is working hard, and that players should appreciate their efforts, instead of expecting a ranked mode at launch.

Scump then went on to reply to multiple different tweets, talking about the CDL’s censorship of its players. Scump said how he was disappointed with the CDL’s behavior as he has dedicated his life to the game and now if he says anything negative he gets a “slap on the wrist”.  He also explained how he tweeted that he “loved the game an hour before” but he would receive a fine for the supposedly controversial tweet about League Play.

More censorship allegations

The major allegations of censorship come when Scump reveals that he was fined by the Call of Duty League for doing a sponsored stream on Raid: Shadow Legends during the offseason.

The Call of Duty League seems to have a ridiculous level of control over its players. Many people believe that Scump could earn more money if he went to full-time content creation and streaming rather than competing as he regularly gets 15-20K viewers on Twitch. And with the CDL imposing such tight restrictions on their players, it might not be long before we see some professionals take this route. With sponsored streams paying thousands of dollars at a time, players will not be happy with the CDL attempting to take a cut, especially when the game is not a direct competitor to Call of Duty itself.

Finally, Scump mentioned how these fines could result in a negative impact on the game. He said how he could be fined for “saying something completely opinion based that he believes would improve the game”. With professionals putting hundreds of hours into the game each year, if they refrain from sharing feedback to avoid possible fines, this could have a negative impact on Call of Duty’s progression and its improvement over the year.

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