Valve Says It Has "A Lot Of Games In Development"

With the success of the Steam Deck and the continued domination Steam has over the PC gaming market, Valve doesn’t really need to do anything else to be a multi-billion dollar company. But fans might remember Valve as the company that made games like Portal, Team Fortress, and Half-Life, and they’d be right to wonder when the company will get back to being more about games than hardware.

Well, worry not fellow Valve heads. In an interview with Famitsu (via TweakTown), Valve product designer Greg Coomer confirmed Valve hasn’t given up on games development despite its success with the Steam Deck.

"We're not stopping making games at all. Valve has a lot of games in development. We will continue to release games," promised Coomer (with translation help from Google). "Game development is very important to Valve. I don't know the exact numbers, but the percentage of employees involved in game development is high. A lot of people are involved."

When asked if Half-Life might be one of the games currently in development, Coomer confirmed flat out that the franchise will certainly continue, but he stopped short of confirming Half-Life 3 being in active development.

"The short answer is yes, there's more to say about the Half-Life world," he said. "Alyx is a sign that Valve has more to say about the world."

Half-Life: Alyx was very much a game designed to showcase Valve's mastery of VR and the incredible hardware of the Valve Index. It's possible, then, that a new Half-Life game in development might do the same for the Steam Deck, or potentially a Steam Deck successor.

Coomer also mentioned Portal as another world that deserves "further exploration," but didn't say if Portal 3 was in development either.

In other recent Valve news, the Steam company is cracking down in key resellers after one indie developer proved that many Steam curators were actually reselling keys provided to them from devs. Several accounts were banned after Brok the InvestiGator developer Cowcat proved that many of them were fake and only existed to spam developers with requests for Steam keys to resell on third-party sites.

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